Wheat

Wheat Ale – Golden to light amber in color, the body is light to medium. The wheat lends a crispness to the brew, often with some acidity. Some hop flavour may be present, but bitterness is low. Not as estery as German or Belgian-style wheats. (RateBeer)

Witbier is a Belgian Style ale that’s very pale and cloudy in appearance due to it being unfiltered and the high level of wheat, and sometimes oats, that’s used in the mash. Always spiced, generally with coriander, orange peel and other oddball spices or herbs in the back ground. The crispness and slight twang comes from the wheat and the lively level of carbonation. This is one style that many brewers in the US have taken a liking to. Often referred to as “white beers” (witbieren) due to the cloudiness / yeast in suspension.

Hefeweizen is a south German style of wheat beer (weissbier) made with a typical ratio of 50:50, or even higher, wheat. A yeast that produces a unique phenolic flavors of banana and cloves with an often dry and tart edge, some spiciness, bubblegum or notes of apples. Little hop bitterness, and a moderate level of alcohol. The “Hefe” prefix means “with yeast”, hence the beers unfiltered and cloudy appearance. A Dunkelweizen is a darker version of hefeweizen (Dunkel means “dark”) with deliciously complex malts and a low balancing bitterness. The usual clove and fruity characters will be present, some may even taste like banana bread. (BeerAdvocate)